Caribbean Tourism

Berry Islands

There are thirty Berry Islands, all of which offer wonderful opportunities for divers and snorkellers. Most are the private homes of the wealthy or inhabited only by wildlife.


Bullock’s Harbour in Great Harbour Cay is the main settlement in the area, Great Harbour Cay is the largest cay in the Berry chain at just two miles across. First settled by ex-slaves in 1836, the cay proved difficult to farm. LL-A The Great Harbour Cay Club is here, with 28 rooms and villas, T954-9219084, F954-9211044. There are facilities for yachts and a nine-hole golf course. Cruise ships drop anchor off Great Sturrup Cay and passengers can spend the day on the deserted beach there.

The only other spot in the Berry Islands which caters for tourists is Chub Cay, which has been extensively rebuilt since Hurricane Andrew in 1992. The LL-L Chub Cay Club (PO Box 661067, Miami Springs, FL 33266, www.chubcay.com, T3251490, F3225199), has rooms and villas, its own airstrip, tennis courts, restaurant, 96-slip marina and extensive dive facilities offered by Chub Cay Undersea Adventures T4623400, F4624100. Chub Cay is a port of entry and has a surge-proof harbour. There is a US$25 charge to use the marina docks to clear customs and immigration unless you take a slip. It is a good place to stop and clean off the salt after a hard crossing. There is a deep water canyon at Chub Cay where you can find a variety of colourful reef fish and open water marine life. Schools of up to 300 Nassau groupers have been seen. Staghorn coral can be seen in the shallow waters near Mamma Rhoda Rock. Less natural, but still fascinating is the submarine deliberately sunk in 90 ft of water off Bond Cay, named after James himself.

Many of the cays do not welcome uninvited guests. Interesting wildlife can be found on Frozen Cay and Alder Cay. Terns and pelicans can be seen here and although they are privately owned, sailors may anchor here to observe the birds. Hoffman’s Cay, now deserted, was originally home to a thriving farming settlement. Ruins of houses, a church and a graveyard still stand. Paths also lead to a deep blue hole. A golden beach runs along the length of the east coast of the island. On Little Whale Cay, Wallace Groves, the founder of Freeport, has his own home and airstrip


More . . .

The Family Islands

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Elbow Cay

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Elbow Cay

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Green Turtle Cay

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Great Guana Cay

The population of Great Guana Cay is about 100. There are a few shops, including a grocery and a liquor store, and most services are...

Man-O-War Cay

This cay is a boat building and repair centre with New England Loyalist origins, where, until recently, blacks were not allowed to stay...