Caribbean Tourism

Bahamas

Cat Island

Named after Arthur Catt, a British pirate who was in league with Henry Morgan and Edward Teach (Blackbeard), Cat Island, (pop: 1,698 1990 census) boasts Lucayan Indian caves near Port Howe, as well as the usual underwater sites of interest and beauty. Fifty miles long, it was once called San Salvador, and is a contender for the site of Columbus’ first...

Bimini

Once thought to be the site of the lost city of Atlantis, the Bimini, (pop: 1,639 1990 census) chain of islands, only 50 miles from Florida, is divided into North and South Bimini and a series of cays. There are more bars than shops on Bimini and service is minimal. It is not a glamorous resort, although there are plenty of luxury yachts moored there. The...

Berry Islands

There are thirty Berry Islands, all of which offer wonderful opportunities for divers and snorkellers. Most are the private homes of the wealthy or inhabited only by wildlife. Bullock’s Harbour in Great Harbour Cay is the main settlement in the area, Great Harbour Cay is the largest cay in the Berry chain at just two miles across. First settled by ex-slaves...

Andros

Andros, (pop: 8,187 1990 census), is the largest island in the Bahamas, with pine and mahogany forests, creeks and prolific birdlife. According to Indian legend, the forests house the ‘chickcharnie’, a mythical, three-fingered, three-toed, red-eyed creature who hangs upside down and can cause good or bad luck. It is also blamed when tools or other things go...

Spanish Cay

Spanish Cay is a private 185-acre island off Cooper’s Town which has recently been developed as a resort. There is a 5,000 ft runway and a full-service marina with a dive shop, Spanish Cay Diving. Transport on the island is by golf cart or walking. LL-L Spanish Cay Inn and Marina has five villas and seven apartments, a restaurant and store overlook the...

Man-O-War Cay

This cay is a boat building and repair centre with New England Loyalist origins, where, until recently, blacks were not allowed to stay overnight. Nearly everyone on the island can trace their family back to Pappy Ben and Mammy Nellie, a young couple who settled there in the 1820s. There are two boatyards now, Edwin’s Boat Yard, which specializes in boat...

Great Guana Cay

The population of Great Guana Cay is about 100. There are a few shops, including a grocery and a liquor store, and most services are available. A wide, sandy beach extends nearly the length of the ocean side of the island, about 5½ miles, although the north end has been developed for use of Treasure Cay visitors. For snorkellers there is a reef just off the...

Green Turtle Cay

The picturesque and quaint village of New Plymouth can be reached from Treasure Cay airport by a short taxi ride (US$3 per person, minimum US$5) and then a ferry from Treasure Cay Dock (US$8, children 2-11yr, US$4, one-way, to Black Sound, White Sound, Bluff Cay or Coco Bay, ferry is three times a day, timed to meet planes, but can be chartered any time,...

Elbow Cay

The name Elbow Cay is rarely used, people refer to the settlement as Hope Town, the main town. It is marked by a striped lighthouse from the top of which you can get lovely views. Built by the British Imperial Lighthouse Service in 1863, it is one of the last hand-powered Kerosene-fuelled beacons still in use. Mon-Fri 1000-1600. White Sound, southwest of...

Elbow Cay

The name Elbow Cay is rarely used, people refer to the settlement as Hope Town, the main town. It is marked by a striped lighthouse from the top of which you can get lovely views. Built by the British Imperial Lighthouse Service in 1863, it is one of the last hand-powered Kerosene-fuelled beacons still in use. Mon-Fri 1000-1600. White Sound, southwest of...

Abaco Islands

The Abaco islands (pop: 10,034 1990 census), are a chain of islands and cays within the Family Islands, are covered in pine forests, stretching in a curve for 130 miles. Great Abaco covers 776 square miles and is the second largest island in the Bahamas after Andros. The main centre on Abaco is Marsh Harbour, of much of Greater Abaco. The scrub and swamp...

The Family Islands

The Family Islands, often called the Out Islands, are very different in atmosphere from New Providence and Grand Bahama. The larger islands are up to 100 miles long, but have only a few thousand inhabitants. Sea and sky come in every possible shade of blue, there are wild cliffs and miles of white sand beaches. Inland, pine forests grow in the northern...

Shopping - New Providence

Shops are open 0900-1700, Monday to Saturday, but some close at 1200 on Thursday. As there is no sales tax and many items are duty-free, buying imported goods can save you about 20-50%, but shop around. The English Shops have Irish linen and gifts from England. Look in the Perfume Shop for French perfume. Try John Bull for watches and cameras. For unusual...

Shopping – Grand Bahama

Many items are tax exempt in the bonded area of Freeport/Lucaya and bargains include perfume, linens, sweaters, china, cameras, emeralds, watches, leather goods and alcoholic drinks. The two main shopping areas are the International Bazaar and Port Lucaya. The International Bazaar is off Ranfurly Circle. Built in 1967, the 10-acre complex was designed by a...

Shopping in Bahamas

For those who want to pick up a bargain, prices of crystal, china and jewellery are cheaper than in the USA. You can find designer clothes and other goods from all over the world at the International Bazaar in Freeport. Local products including straw items, Androsia batik printed silk and cotton, shell jewellery and wood carvings. Bargaining is expected in...