Caribbean Tourism

Excursions

Being the most easterly island and extremely difficult to attack, there are few defensive forts on Barbados.


Instead the great houses of the sugar growing plantocracy give the island its historic perspective and most of its tourist attractions. Many parish churches are also impressive buildings. The island is not large but it is easy to get lost when driving. Deep gullies cut in the coral limestone which is the surface rock over most of the island. These are often full of wildlife and plants but make travelling around very confusing. It sometimes helps to remember that the island is divided into 11 parishes named after 10 saints, Christ Church being the eleventh. A good map is essential. The bus service is cheap and efficient and recommended even for families with small children.


More . . .

The Centre

Northeast of Holetown and reached from St Simon’s Church are Turners Hall Woods, a good vantage point. It is thought that the wood has...

The Scotland District

St Nicholas Abbey Just to the northwest is St Nicholas Abbey which is approached down a long and impressive avenue of mahogany trees....

Southeast Coast

The area around Six Cross Roads was where the Easter Rebellion of 1816 took place (see Easter). You can visit one of the great houses (...

The West Coast

The mass development of the west coast was carried out only recently. The beaches are easily eroded and can be covered with broken coral...

St Lucy

The road north of Speightstown is mercifully free of buildings and there is a good sandy beach on Six Men’s Bay. Go through Littlegood...

The Atlantic Parishes

The five-mile East Coast Rd, opened by Queen Elizabeth on 15 February 1966 affords fine views. From Belleplaine, where the railway ended,...

The Garrison Area

Cross the Careenage by the Charles Duncan O’Neale Bridge (one of the bus terminals and market area are just to the west) and follow Bay St...