Caribbean Tourism

History

There were Amerindians on Barbados for upwards of a thousand years. The first Europeans to find the island were the Portuguese, who named it ‘Os Barbados’ after the Bearded Fig trees which grew on the beaches, and left behind some wild pigs.


These bred successfully and provided meat for the first English settlers, who arrived in 1627 and found an island which was otherwise uninhabited. It is not clear why the Amerindians abandoned the island, although several theories exist. King Charles I gave the Earl of Carlisle permission to colonize the island and it was his appointed Governor, Henry Hawley, who in 1639 founded the House of Assembly. Within a few years, there were upwards of 40,000 white settlers, mostly small farmers, and equivalent in number to about 1% of the total population of England at this period. After the ‘sugar revolution’ of the 1650s most of the white population left. For the rest of the colonial period sugar was king, and the island was dominated by a small group of whites who owned the estates, the ‘plantocracy’. The majority of the population today is descended from African slaves who were brought in to work on the plantations; but there is a substantial mixed-race population, and there has always been a small number of poor whites, particularly in the east part of the island. Many of these are descended from 100 prisoners transported in 1686 after the failed Monmouth rebellion and Judge Jeffrey’s ‘Bloody Assizes’.

The two principal political parties are the Barbados Labour Party (BLP) and the Democratic Labour Party (DLP). A third party is the National Democratic Party (NDP), but it is no longer very active. The Democratic Labour Party held office in 1986-94. Economic difficulties in the 1990s eroded support for the government. The Prime Minister Erskine Sandiford narrowly lost a vote of confidence in June 1994, and stood aside for his Finance Minister David Thompson, who led the party into a general election on 6 September. The BLP won the elections with 19 seats, compared with eight for the DLP and one for the NDP. Mr Owen Arthur, then 44, an economist, became Prime Minister and took on the portfolios of Finance and Economic Affairs. In the January 1999 general elections, the BLP was returned with an overwhelming vote of confidence. It won 26 of the 28 seats, while the DLP won the other two. The NDM did not contest the elections.


More . . .

Culture

Literature: Two Barbadian writers whose work has had great influence throughout the Caribbean are the novelist George Lamming and the poet...

The Easter Rebellion

The 1816 Easter Rebellion was an uprising by slaves who thought (incorrectly) that William Wilberforce had introduced a bill in the English...

Introduction

Barbados, the most easterly of the Caribbean Islands, is struck by the pounding Atlantic surf on the East Coast and washed be the gentle...

Barbados, easternmost island of the West Indies

Barbados, easternmost island of the West Indies, blends its rich history with up-to-date sophistication in life beside the sea -- the best...

HOW TO GET THERE

AIRLINES: Air Canada. Air Jamaica. Airtours. American Airlines. Britannia. British Airways, (Inc Concorde). BWIA. Caledonian Airways. LIAT...

MONEY/ BUSINESS GUIDE

BANKS: Barbados National Bank. Bank of Nova Scotia. Barclays Bank. Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce (CIBC) Caribbean Ltd. Caribbean...

COUNTRY PROFILE AND MAP

GEOGRAPHY: Barbados, the most easterly of the Caribbean Islands, lies within 13 degrees North & 59 degrees West with the Atlantic surf...