Caribbean Tourism

Food & Drink

Where the Buccaneers Came From

The French and English freebooters who began settling on Tortuga Island in 1630 were drawn by the south coast’s coves, beaches and small anchorages, and a protective line of reefs with few openings. Pirate raids had led Spain to withdraw from the north and west coasts of Hispaniola in 1605, leaving livestock that multiplied and was hunted by the freebooters...

Excursions

Port-Au-Prince The central reference point for visitors is the large, irregularly shaped park called the Champs de Mars which begins to the east of the commercial quarter. The northwest corner is dominated by the white, triple-domed presidential palace. It was built in 1918 on the site of a predecessor that was blown up in 1912 with its president inside. In...

Hispaniola

One might expect that a relatively small island such as Hispaniola (from Spanish 'Isla Espanola' the Spanish island) lying in the heart of the Caribbean would be occupied by one nation, or at least that its people should demonstrate ethnic and cultural similarities. This is not so. Hispaniola, with an area of just over 75,800 sq km, not much more than half...

West of Port-au-Prince

The southwestern peninsula is the greenest and most beautiful part of Haiti: its rugged western tip has forests, rivers, waterfalls and unspoilt beaches. west of port-au-prince The Route Nationale 2 to Les Cayes is very scenic but is frequently almost non-existent and where there is any surface it is often seriously potholed. For the first 92 kilometres it...

Northeast of Port-au-Prince

Grandly called the Route National 3, the 128-kilometre dirt road northeast from Port-au-Prince to Hinche requires a four-wheel drive and takes at least five hours (much longer by public transport). It starts by crossing the Cul de Sac plain via Croix-des-Bouquets. Here, a newly improved road branches off southeast through a parched, barren region, skirting...

Places to Eat – Port Salut

Chez Jean Pierre is a must, friendly and welcoming to foreigners. Order evening meal in the afternoon, lobster supper for 2 with rice, banana, sauce and 4 rum and colas cost US$17, restaurants on the beach are more expensive and not so tasty.

Places to Eat – Cap Haïtien

Cap 2000, Rue 5 and Blvd (not far from waterfront). Sandwiches, ice cream; a popular and cheap restaurant, good food but basic, is on Ave L just past the corner with Rue 1, near Hotel Columbia.

Food & Drink

Food Most restaurants offer Créole or French cuisine, or a mixture of both. Haiti’s Créole cuisine is like its Caribbean cousins, but more peppery. Specialities include griot (deep-fried pieces of pork), lambi (conch, considered an aphrodisiac), tassot (jerked beef) and rice with djon-djon (tiny, dark mushrooms). As elsewhere in the Caribbean, lobster is...

Places to Eat – Port-au-Prince

Almost the only places to eat out at night in Port-au-Prince proper are the Oloffson or Holiday Inn, or a row of terrace cafés selling barbecued chicken at the SE corner of the Champs de Mars (starting nr Rex theatre). Bars in this area will probably try and short change you if they think you’re a guest at the Holiday Inn. Well-off Port-au-Princiens go up...

Places to Eat – Pétionville

Plantation (T 57-0979), impasse Fouchard (turning off rue Borno) excellent French chef, good wine, rec; Le Souvenance, 8 rue Gabart at the corner of Aubran, gourmet French cuisine, rec, pricey; Chez Gerard (T 57-1949), 17 rue Pinchinat (nr Place St Pierre), French, pricey; Les Cascades (T 57-6704), 73 rue Clerveaux, French. La Voile (T 57-4561), 32 rue...