Caribbean Tourism

Petion-Ville

Pétion-Ville was once the capital’s hill resort lying just 15 minutes from Port- au-Prince but 450 m above sea level. Now it is considered a middle-class suburb with restaurants and boutiques. Three roads lead up from Port-au-Prince. The northernmost, the Route de Delmas, is ugly and dusty. Preferable to this is the Panaméricaine, an extension of Avenue John Brown (Cr: Lali), which is serviced by camionettes. The southernmost, Route du Canapé Vert, has the best views.


In Pétion-Ville, the main streets Lamarre and Grégoire are parallel to each other, one block apart, on the six blocks between the Panaméricaine and the Place St Pierre. Most of the shops, galleries and restaurants are on or between these two streets or within a couple of blocks of them.


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