Caribbean Tourism

Haiti

Shopping – Port-au-Prince

Art and craft Some galleries have a nr monopoly on certain artists, so don’t expect to see a cross-section of all the major artists in any one, good gallery. The paintings hung at the Oloffson are for sale. Galerie Carlos Jara (T 45-7164) has a fine collection at 28 rue Armand Holly, Debussy, 10 mins drive uphill from the Oloffson. The Nader family has two...

Transport – Port-au-Prince

Taxis Local Shared taxis, called Publiques or simply taxis, are flagged down. They charge a basic fare (Cr: kous) of US$0.20 that may double or treble (de kous, twa kous) depending on how far off the beaten track you go. A red ribbon tied to the inside rear-view mirror identifies them. Language skills are needed. They stop work at about 1930. Camionettes (...

Entertainment – Port-au-Prince

The Oloffson has a voodoo beat concert or a folklore show 3 nights a week, RAM performs Thur, the place to be. Otherwise, the best nightlife is to be found in Pétionville (see separate section). There is a red-light district on the SW Carrefour road that has been badly eclipsed by AIDS and political turmoil. The central part of the establishments consist of...

Places to Eat – Port-au-Prince

Almost the only places to eat out at night in Port-au-Prince proper are the Oloffson or Holiday Inn, or a row of terrace cafés selling barbecued chicken at the SE corner of the Champs de Mars (starting nr Rex theatre). Bars in this area will probably try and short change you if they think you’re a guest at the Holiday Inn. Well-off Port-au-Princiens go up...

Accommodation – Port-au-Prince

Hotels L3-A2 Oloffson (rue Cadet Jérémie at intersection with rue Capois, T 23-4000/23-4102, F 23-0919), model for Hotel Trianon in Graham Greene’s The Comedians, eccentrically managed by Haitian-American musician Richard Morse, Haiti’s most charming hotel but you pay for the atmosphere, the rooms are not worth the price, haunt of writers, journalists and...

Shopping – Pétionville

Pétionville has many elegant boutiques, galleries, bookshops and delicatessen. Rec is La Promenade at the intersection of Grégoire and Moïse (SE corner of Place St Pierre), a garden turned into small shopping promenade with an outdoor cafe, 1000-1800. Art and handicrafts Galerie Bourbon-Lally (T 57-6321/3397), 24 rue Lamarre, corner of rue Villate, owned...

Nightlife – Pétionville

Café Des Arts (T 57-7979), 19 rue Lamarre (same house as Galerie Monnin) open 1900 until late, dining and live music; Bambu, corner of rues Lamarre and Chavannes, especially when they have live bands; Faces, in the Hotel El Rancho, also Sat evening live jazz; Blackout, popular bar hangout round the corner from the Bolero. The Garage, a couple of blocks...

Places to Eat – Pétionville

Plantation (T 57-0979), impasse Fouchard (turning off rue Borno) excellent French chef, good wine, rec; Le Souvenance, 8 rue Gabart at the corner of Aubran, gourmet French cuisine, rec, pricey; Chez Gerard (T 57-1949), 17 rue Pinchinat (nr Place St Pierre), French, pricey; Les Cascades (T 57-6704), 73 rue Clerveaux, French. La Voile (T 57-4561), 32 rue...

Accommodation – Pétionville

Hotels A1 Montana (T 57-1920/21), rue Cardozo (a turning off the Panaméricaine at the entrance to Pétionville), an oasis of luxury, best views over Port-au-Prince, especially from poolside restaurant, EP all a/c; A2 El Rancho (T 57-4926, F 57-4134), rue José de San Martín, just off the Panaméricaine, casino, nightclub, sauna, spa, EP all a/c. A2 Villa...

Accommodation – Cap Haïtien

Cap-Haïtien gets electricity only 1900-2300. A Mont-Joli, on hillside above town, T2620300/26, Port-au-Prince 2227764, Email: Mont...@aol.com. Pool, tennis court, good restaurant, own generator runs 1000-1200 and 1730-0600, rooms with private bath and a/c, CP. Nearby is C Les Jardins de l’Océan, Boulevard de Mer, T2622277/2621169. Small hotel, nice terrace...

Accommodations

The Association Hotelière et Touristique d’Haïti is at Choucoune Plaza, Pétion-Ville, T2574647. Camping Camping in Haiti is an adventure. The dramatic scenery is very enticing but access to much of it is over rough terrain and there are no facilities, leaving exploring to the rugged. Campers have to take everything and create, or find their own shelter....

Cap Haïtien

Cap Haïtien, Haiti’s second city,has a dramatic location on the sheltered, SE side of an 824m high cape, from which it gets its name. It was the capital in colonial times, when it was called Cap Français. Its wealth and sophistication earned it the title of ‘Paris of the Antilles’. The colony’s biggest port, it was also the commercial centre of the northern...

Travel Hints

Haiti is especially fascinating for the tourist who is avid for out-of-the-way experience. In order that you may make the most of your visit, we offer the following hints. Although it is one of the poorest countries in the world, most of whose citizens suffer from one kind of oppression or another, Haiti is proud of having been the only nation to have...

Festivals

The standard of the Port-au-Prince Carnival has fallen since the Duvaliers left (see History). Nowadays few people wear costumes and the floats are poorly decorated. There is a cacophony of music blaring out from both stands and passing floats. Excitement is provided by the walking bands (bandes-à-pied), cousins of the Rara bands that appear after carnival...

Flora & Fauna

Deforestation and soil erosion have destroyed habitats. Haiti is therefore poor in flora and fauna compared with its eastern neighbour. Three sites are worth visiting. One is Lake Saumâtre, 90 mins E of the capital. Less brackish than Enriquillo, across the Dominican border, it is the habitat of more than 100 species of waterfowl (including migratory North...