Caribbean Tourism

Getting There

Dreadlocks to Reggae: Jammin’ in Jamaica

Followers of the Rastafarian cult are easily recognizable by their long dreadlocks. They are non-violent, do not eat pork and believe in the divinity of the late Emperor of Ethiopia, Haile Selassie (Ras Tafari). Haile Selassie’s call for the end of the superiority of one race over another has been incorporated into a faith which holds that God, Jah, will...

Excursions

Kingston Among older buildings of note in the Down Town area are Gordon House (on Duke Street), which dates from the mid-18th century and houses the Jamaican legislature. Visitors are allowed into the Strangers’ Gallery but must be suitably dressed (jackets for men and dresses for women). There is also the early 18th century parish church south of Parade,...

West to Falmouth

Continuing west along the coast is Runaway Bay, an attractive and friendly resort. It is named for the Spanish governor Ysasi, who left quickly for Cuba in a canoe when he saw the English coming. Only five miles away is Discovery Bay where Columbus made his first landing. The Columbus Park, an outdoor museum, has exhibits and relics of Jamaican history....

The South Coast

Bluefields Outside Savanna-la-Mar, the main south coast road (A2) passes by Paradise Plantation, a huge private estate with miles of frontage on Bluefields Bay, a wide protected anchorage with unspoiled reefs and wetlands teeming with birds. Just after Paradise, you come to Ferris Crossroads, where the A2 meets up with the B8 road, a well-maintained north-...

Port Royal

Port Royal,the old naval base, lies across the harbour from Kingston. It was founded in 1650, captured by the English and turned into a strategic military and naval base. Merchant shipping developed under naval protection and the town soon became prosperous. It also attracted less reputable shipping and in 1660-92 became a haven for pirates such as Henry...

Port Antonio

Once the major banana port where many of the island’s first tourists arrived, on banana boats, Port Antonio,dates back to the 16th century. Its prosperity has for many years been in gentle decline and it is now run down, but it has an atmosphere unlike any other town in Jamaica with some superb old public buildings. It is an excellent base from which to...

Ocho Rios

On a bay sheltered by reefs and surrounded by coconut groves, sugar cane and fruit plantations, is Ocho Rios. The town has become very popular, with many cruise ships making a stop here. It is 64 miles east of Montego Bay and claims some of the best beaches on the island. The beach in town is safe and well-organized with facilities, 200 yds from Main Street...

Montego Bay

About 120 miles from Kingston, situated on the northwest coast, is Montego Bay,Jamaica’s principal tourist centre with all possible watersport amenities. Known familiarly as Mo’ Bay, it has superb natural features, sunshine most of the year round, a beautiful coastline with miles of white sand, deep blue water never too cold for bathing and gentle winds...

Mandeville

After Bamboo Avenue, the A2 road goes through Lacovia and Santa Cruz, an expanding town on the St Elizabeth Plain, and on up to Mandeville,a peaceful upland town with perhaps the best climate on the island. It is very spread out, with building on all the surrounding hills and no slums. In recent years, Mandeville has derived much of its prosperity from...

Eastern Jamaica & The Mountains

North from Kingston Behind Kingston lie the Blue Mountains with Blue Mountain Peak rising to a height of 7,402 ft (2,256 m). This is undoubtedly one of the most spectacular and beautiful parts of Jamaica and an area which must be visited by keen bird watchers and botanists and also by those who like mountain walking. It is possible to explore some of the...