Caribbean Tourism

Before Travelling

Documents

The regulations are the same as for France. In most cases the only document required for entry is a passport, the exceptions being citizens of Australia, South Africa, Bolivia, Dominica, St Lucia, Barbados, Jamaica, Trinidad, Haiti, Honduras, El Salvador, Dominican Republic, Turkey, when a visa is required.


In 2000, for a trial period of three months, St Lucians were allowed to enter without visas for visits of up to 15 days. If successful, the scheme may be extended to other countires in the Organization of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS). Any non-EU citizen staying longer than three months needs an extended visa. Citizens of the United States and Canada staying less than three weeks do not need a passport, although some form of identification with a photo is required. A valid passport is recommended to avoid unnecessary problems and delays and is required for everybody staying more than three weeks. An onward ticket is necessary but not always asked for.

Customs

With the abolition of EU frontiers, Europeans are able to bring back the same entitlements as from mainland France. However you could run into problems if returning via Antigua, with a long, uncomfortable wait in transit. Take a direct flight to France if buying in bulk.

Health

Vaccination certificates are not required if you are French, American or Canadian, but if you come from South America or some of the Caribbean Islands an international certificate for small pox and yellow fever vaccinations is compulsory.

Money

Banking hours are given under the various islands, as are the names of banks. There are money-changing offices in the big hotels and at airports. The French franc is the legal tender, but US$ are preferred in Saint-Martin and are widely accepted elsewhere. There is no limit to travellers’ cheques and letters of credit being imported, but a declaration of foreign bank notes in excess of 3,500F must be made.


More . . .

Before Travelling

Climate The lushness of Martinique’s vegetation is evidence that it has a far higher rainfall than many of the islands, due to its...

North Martinique

The area of Basse-Pointe is the pineapple cultivation area of the island, where huge fields of spikey pineapple tops can be seen. Basse-...

The Tropical Rainforest

La Route de la Trace winds through the tropical rainforest on the slopes of the Pitons du Carbet from Fort-de-France to Morne Rouge on the...

Tourist Information

Local Tourist Office Lamentin Airport, T 421805/18 06; Bord de la Mer, Fort-de-France, T 602773/602795, F 736693. Postal address: Office...

On Arrival

Airports Lamentin Airport, T 421600. A new, modern airport opened 1996. There is a Tourist Office for hotel reservations and information, T...

Accommodation

Hotels Martinique offers a wide range of accommodation from the modest family-run auberges scattered over the remote and spectacular N, to...

Fort-de-France

Fort-de-France was originally built around the Fort St-Louis in the 17th century. The settlement’s first name was Fort-Royal and its...