Caribbean Tourism

History

Saba was first discovered by Columbus on his second voyage in 1493 but not colonized. Sir Francis Drake sighted it in 1595, as did the Dutchmen Pieter Schouten in 1624 and Piet Heyn in 1626.


Some shipwrecked Englishmen landed in 1632, finding it uninhabited. In 1635 the French claimed it but in the 1640s the Dutch settled it, building communities at Tent Bay and The Bottom. However, it was not until 1816 that the island became definitively Dutch, the interregnum being marked by 12 changes in sovereignty, with the English, Dutch, French and Spanish all claiming possession.


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Saba

Saba The island is an extinct volcano which shoots out of the sea, green with lush vegetation but without beaches. In fact there is only one...

Before Travelling

Climate The average temperature is 25-28°C, 78-82°F during the day but at night it can fall to 16-18°C, the low 60°Fs. The higher up you...

Getting There

Air Large aircraft cannot be accommodated although there are plans to build a longer runway. Planes do not land in bad weather in case they...

Getting Around

Land Car Hire There are no buses on the island but you can hire a jeep or car. Drive on the right. Johnson’s Rent A Car, at Juliana’s Guest...

Communication

Telephone Services Most hotels have direct dialling worldwide, otherwise overseas calls can be made from Landsradio phone booths in...

Tourist Information

Tourist Office The Saba Tourist Board (Glenn Holm, Zuleyka and Angelique) is at Lambee’s Place in Windwardside, open Mon-Fri, 0800-1200,...

Accommodations

There are no resort hotels yet on Saba and even the most expensive are small and friendly. December to April is the busiest season,...