Caribbean Tourism

Mustique

Lying 18 miles south of St Vincent, Mustique is three miles long and less than two miles wide. In the 1960s, Mustique was acquired by a single proprietor who developed the island as his private resort where he could entertain the rich and famous. It is a beautiful island, with fertile valleys, steep hills and 12 miles of white sandy beach, but described by some as ‘manicured’.


It is no longer owned by one person and is more accessible to tourists, although privacy and quiet is prized by those who can afford to live there. There is no intention to commercialize the island; it has no supermarkets and only one petrol pump for the few cars (people use mopeds or golf carts to get around). Apart from the private homes, there are two hotels, one beach bar, a few boutiques, shops, a small village and a fishing camp. All house rentals are handled by the Mustique Company, which organizes activities such as picnics and sports, especially at Easter and Christmas. Radio is the principal means of communication, and the airstrip, being in the centre of the island is clearly visible, so check-in time is five minutes before take off (that is after you’ve seen your plane land).

There is sailing, diving, snorkelling and good swimming (very little waterskiing). Riding can also be arranged or you can hire a moped to tour the island. The main anchorage is Brittania Bay, where there are 18 moorings for medium sized yachts with waste disposal and phones. Take a picnic lunch to Macaroni Beach on the Atlantic side. This gorgeous, white sand beach is lined with small palm-thatched pavilions and a well-kept park/picnic area. It is isolated and wonderful. Swimming and snorkelling is also good at Lagoon Bay, Gallicaux Bay, Britannia Bay and Endeavour Bay, all on the leeward side.

Basil’s Bar and Restaurant is the congregating spot for yachtsmen and the jet set. Snorkelling is good here too. From it there is a well-beaten path to the Cotton House Hotel, which is the other congregating point. There is an honour system to pay for moorings at Basil’s Bar, EC$40 a night, EC$20 second night. Johanna Morris has a group of shops: The Pink House, The Purple House, Johanna’s Banana, Treasure Fashion, Basil’s Boutique and Across Forever.

Since the island has no freshwater, it is shipped in on Mustique Boats Robert Junior (T4571918) and the Geronimo. Both take passengers and excursions on Sunday (EC$10, two hour trip)


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